Things You Didn’t Know About The Impact Of Windows 10


You can’t have failed to notice that Microsoft has launched a new version of its Windows operating system. Windows 10 aims to take the best bits of the widely disliked Window 8/8.1 and put back some of the bits of older versions, such as the Start menu, and encourage individuals and businesses to shift to the latest version.

Yes, It’s Free

The big difference between this and earlier major Windows releases is that Windows 10 is being rolled out for free to users of Windows 7 and 8. The impact of this is likely to be that take-up of the new version will be much faster than that for previous versions.

Often people wait until they buy a new PC before upgrading their operating system, but the lure of getting something for nothing should mean people will shift to Windows 10 more readily. Reports suggest that the adoption rate could be higher than 70 percent.

Major Changes

Of course, changing operating systems is a major undertaking, but first impressions of Windows 10 are that for most people it seems to be a smooth process. Thanks to pre-release versions, software testing services will have been working for months to ensure that applications and drivers are compatible and work well on the new system.

The upgrade process allows you to keep your existing software and files from your earlier version of Windows, so other than getting to grips with the new Start menu, there should be few problems for most people. Companies such as Bug finders expert software testers will help ensure any new apps and updates are Windows 10 compatible.

Many people hated the split-personality aspect of Windows 8, with the tiled start screen separate from the desktop. You’ll be pleased to know that Windows 10 goes back to a more conventional desktop view. There are still live tiles on the Start menu, but it’s now back in the bottom left corner where it belongs. A pill mode is offered for those with appropriate systems.

You’ll find new features such as the Cortana personal assistant and the sleeker Edge web browser that replaces Internet Explorer. If you had a version of Windows with Media Center, you’ll find that it’s no more, though Microsoft is releasing a free software DVD player for people with those versions.